Corante

About this author
Zack Lynch is author of The Neuro Revolution: How Brain Science Is Changing Our World (St. Martin's Press, July 2009).
He is the founder and executive director of the Neurotechnology Industry Organization (NIO) and co-founder of NeuroInsights. He serves on the advisory boards of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies, Science Progress, and SocialText, a social software company. Please send newsworthy items or feedback - to Zack Lynch.
Follow me on Twitter at @neurorev
Receive by email

GUEST AUTHOR ARCHIVES
THE NEURO REVOLUTION
TNRCoverWeb120.jpg Buy on Amazon
In the Pipeline: Don't miss Derek Lowe's excellent commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry in general at In the Pipeline

Brain Waves

August 1, 2011

Chinese Cover of The Neuro Revolution

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

TNR%20Cover%20China.jpg

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

September 26, 2010

Neuroscience Hearing on Capitol Hill Wednesday Sept 29, 2pm

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

Screen%20shot%202010-09-26%20at%2010.17.45%20AM.png
Please join me this coming Wednesday on Capitol Hill when the Oversight and Government Reform Committee has scheduled a hearing on "The Future of Neuroscience Research and Development." The hearing will be held at 2:00 p.m. in room 2203 Rayburn House Office Building, and I urge you to attend.

NIO's conversations with Congressman Kennedy and others on the Hill were the impetus for this hearing. We identified a need for a congressional examination of the government's existing coordination among neuroscience research arms and pressed for congressional exploration. During our meetings on Capitol Hill we have continually emphasized the importance of increased coordination in government neuroscience research, strong government support for innovative neurotech ventures, as well as increased resources for the FDA to enable efficient reviews of neurotech products.

I'd like to thank Congressman Kennedy for taking seriously our call of oversight and exploration of this important area as well as all of our members for their efforts and support.

Congressman Kennedy wanted me to pass on this personal letter from him regarding the neuroscience hearing next Wednesday at 2PM. We hope you can come.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NIO

September 8, 2010

The Neuro Revolution Published in Japan as "Neuro Wars"

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

NeuroRevJapanCover.pngThe Neuro Revolution was recently published in Japan! Here is the cover. They chose a slightly different title for this translation, Neuro Wars (ala Star Wars). Buy in Japan here. Looking forward to China, Korea and Brazil next!

It was while researching and writing this book over the past decade that many of my ideas around how develop social motivations systems that engender successful behavior change were formed. I look forward to the day when we can leverage cutting edge behavioral neuroscience techniques on a real-time basis in Japan and throughout the world to help people live happier, healthier lives.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

July 2, 2010

Neurotech 2010: Translational Researchers Highlight Innovation

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

NDF.pngWhile venture capitalists have been dialing back on potentially risky early stage investments, translational researchers have been marching ahead. Government funding is pushing new discoveries forward, but sometimes the best of these languish in academic labs where companies and more adventurous investors are less likely to discover them. This year the Neurotech Development Foundation (NDF), a new nonprofit founded to promote the advancement of translational neuroscience research, and several institutes at the NIH (including NINDS, NIMH, and NIA) teamed up to find and showcase the most promising work to Neurotech 2010 attendees in Boston on May 20, 2010. We've just posted the full article here which highlights the breakthrough translational work of the researchers selected for the session.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NIO

June 15, 2010

The Neuro Revolution in China Progressing

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

My translator at the Science Press of China recently reached out to me for help on translating The Neuro Revolution for China. I found his correspondence interesting...

Although I have kept a good record of translation since 1978, with four national awards for my translational work in science and popular science fields, your book hitherto is the most challenging one, not only for its frontal knowledge, numeral quotations and latest slangs, but also unfamiliar areas for me, such as religion and jazz, either as topics outside my personal preference or as the consequence of China's long isolation from the world and hostile attitude towards ideologies and cultures different from what the government here wants to enforce. Now with your help, my confidence has been greatly enhanced.

The Japan translation is coming along well too. Should be out in Tokyo before the end of the year.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

April 29, 2010

Speakers for Neurotech 2010 - Boston, May 19-20

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

350_conference-banner-2010-350.jpgWe've been heads down putting together an amazing conference this year. Visit the Neurotech 2010 conference website to see full schedule. Here are this year's speakers:

Andrew Firlik General Partner, Foundation Medical Partners; Stephen Knight, Managing Partner, Fidelity Biosciences; Art Pappas, Managing Partner, Pappas Ventures; Liam Ratcliffe, Venture Partner, New Leaf Venture Partners; Casey Lynch, Managing Director, NeuroInsights -- Ulf Ljungberg, CEO, NeuroNova; Brad Margus, President & CEO, Envoy Therapeutics; Will Rosellini, CEO, MicroTransponder Inc.; Jim Schoeneck, President & CEO, BrainCells, Inc., Ellen Baron, Partner, Oxford Bioscience Partners -- Mike Detke, Chief Medical Officer, MedAvante; Jamie Heywood Co-founder, Chairman, PatientsLikeMe; Remy Luthringer, CEO, Forenap Pharma; Suzan Onel Partner, K&L Gates; Joyce Cramer, President, Epilepsy Therapy Project -- Greg Stock, CEO, Signum Biosciences; Konrad Glund, CEO, Probiodrug; Michael Pierschbacher, CEO, American Life Science Pharmaceuticals; Shawn Lyndon. CEO, Orasi Medical; Dan O'Connell, Managing Partner, NeuroVentures Capital -- Chris Fibiger Chief Scientific Officer, Biovail; Marianne De Backer, VP Business Development, Johnson & Johnson; Guy Seabrook, Sr. Director, Neuroscience Global External Research & Development, Eli Lilly; Ravi Kiron,Managing Director, Adjuvant Global Advisors -- Christopher deCharms, CEO, Omneuron; Alex Doman, CEO, Advanced Brain Technologies, Tom Dusenberry, CEO, Dusenberry Entertainment; Revere Greist Founder, Waypoint Health Innovations; A.K. Pradeep, CEO, NeuroFocus, Roger Quy General Partner, Technology Partners -- Shafique Virani, Director CNS Business Development, Roche; Lothar Krinke, SVP, Research and Development, Medtronic; Leslie Coney; Sr. Director of Business Development, Biogen Idec; Doug Carlson Sr. Director, US Business Development, Lundbeck A/S; Christine de Los Reyes,Managing Partner, Biotech Partnering Solutions; Jim Broderick, President, SetPoint Medical; Ed Boyden, Assistant Professor, MIT Media Lab; Ben Matteo, CEO, Eos Neuroscience; Marcelo Lima, President and CEO, ImThera Medical, -- Derek Small, COO & Acting CEO, Naurex, Bob Linke, President & CEO, Embera NeuroTherapeutics; Andreas Neef, Fellow, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology; Walter Greenleaf President & CEO, InWorld Solutions; Manuel Lopez-Figueroa, Vice President, Bay City Capital -- Amy Kruse Executive Director, Neuroscience Division, Total Immersion Software, Kaleb McDowell, Soldier Performance Division, Neuroscience Strategic Research Initiative, Cognition & Neuroergonomics - Collaborative Alliance Manager, Army Research Laboratory; Dylan Schmorrow, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Assistant Director, Human Systems, Roy Stripling, Head Human Performance Training & Education, Office of Naval Research, Chris Forsythe, Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, Sandia National Laboratories -- Ronald Burch CEO, Cerephex, Stephen Collins, President and CEO, NeuroTherapeutics Pharma; Bruce McCarthy,CEO, Afferent Pharmaceuticals; Linda Watkins, Founder, Xalud Therapeutics; Heath Lukatch, Partner, Novo Ventures Bruce Bean, Harvard; Gabriela Chiosis, Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Miles Cunningham, McLean Hospital; Hagit Eldar-Finkelman, Tel Aviv University; Ana Lukic, Predictek; Mike Vitek, Cognosci, Junying Yuan, Harvard; Jill Heemskerk, Program Director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS/NIH

If you are in neurotech, you should probably be here. Register

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NIO

March 23, 2010

Giving the Brain a Voice: NIO Public Policy Tour in DC tomorrow

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

US_Capitol.jpg
I've organized NIO's fourth annual Public Policy Tour of Washington, DC tomorrow with the help of the K&L Gates team. The one-day event will focus on high-level meetings on Capitol Hill. Meetings are scheduled with key congressmen and their staffers at their offices. We have over a dozen executives flying in who will introduce NIO and present our key proposals, including the National Neurotechnology Initiative (NNTI) and for Congressional hearings on the state of federal neuroscience research and development. Meetings set up with Lynch (D-MA), Space (D-OH), Kennedy (D-RI), Whitfield (R-KY), Schakowsky (D-IL), Sutton (D-OH), Jordan (R-OH),Rogers (R-MI), Tierney (D-MA), Pallone (D-NJ), Dingell (D-MI), Eshoo (D-CA), Capps (D-CA), Shadegg (R-AZ), Cummings (D-MD) and several more.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NIO

March 2, 2010

McGovern Institue for Brain Research at MIT Goes Web 2.0

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

It's no secret I a big fan of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT. They've launched a new website with lots of cool videos and details about the extraordinary research they are doing. Take a few minutes and wander around for yourself and become a fan on FaceBook.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Brain Foundations

February 9, 2010

The Neurodiagnostics Report 2010: Brain Imaging, Biomarkers and NeuroInformatics

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

120_Neurodiagnostics_Report_Cover_200.jpgWe've recently published "The Neurodiagnostics Report 2010: Brain Imaging, Biomarkers and NeuroInformatics," a report published by NeuroInsights. It is a fully updated second annual industry insider report detailing markets and emerging diagnostics in neurology and psychiatry. In addition to the massive unmet markets, long-term growth in neurodiagnostics is being driven by technology advances and equipment upgrades in neuroimaging; new biomarkers and imaging protocols for early diagnosis and disease monitoring; and increased use of imaging and informatics in drug and device development.

NeuroInsights has identified three primary markets in neurodiagnostics which are discussed in detail in this report: Neuroimaging: Medical equipment and reagents for research, diagnostics and patient monitoring, including MRI, CT, PET, SPECT, EEG and MEG. In vitro diagnostics: Genetic testing, biomarker assays and chemical profiling of human samples, including urine, blood, cerebral spinal fluid and tissue. Neuroinformatics: Multidimensional databases and software systems that store and analyze data from the genetic to the behavioral level.

Partial list of companies discussed in the report include: Abbot Diagnostics, Adlyfe, Advanced Brain Monitoring, Applied NeuroSolutions, Aspect Medical (Covidien), Astro-Med, Athena Diagnostics, Avacta, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Bayer, BioBehavioral Diagnostics, Brain Resource, BrainScope, Cambridge Cognition, CNS Response, CNS Vital, CogState, Compumedics, Cytox, Electrical Geodesics, Elminda, ExonHit, GE, GeneNews, g-Nostics, Hitachi, Johnson & Johnson, Kappametrics, Knopp Neurosciences, Michael J. Fox Foundation, Natus Medical, NeuroMetrix, Neuronetrix, Neuroptix, NeuroTrax, NeuroVigil, NeuroVista, Nymox, Odin, Optima Neuroscience, Optimal Medicine, Orasi Medical, Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Pfizer, Philips, PhysioSonics, Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Consortium, Psynova, Quest Diagnostics, Roche, Rules-Based, Medicine, Satoris, Siemens, SleepMed, The Genetics Company, TheraGenetics, Toshiba,Transcription Diagnostics, Vanda, Wyeth and more. To view the full list of 150 companies included in this extensive report, click here.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurodiagnostics

February 1, 2010

Neuropharma FDA Approvals Down in 2009

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

200_Neurosurgery-Cover.jpgAs we report today in this month's edition of Neurotech Insights, five of the 26 new drugs and biologics approved by the FDA were neuropharmaceuticals: Vanda/Novartis’ Fanapt for schizophrenia, Lundbeck's Sabril for infantile spasms and add-on for refractory partial seizures, Cypress/Forest’s Savella for fibromyalgia, Merck's (Organon) Saphris for bipolar and schizophrenia, and Novartis’ branded version of betaseron for multiple sclerosis.. This compares to seven neuropharmaceutical approvals out of 24 in 2008 (Pristiq, Relistor, Entereg, Xenazine, Vimpat, Banzel and tapentadol) and only two of 17 in 2007.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuropharma

January 17, 2010

Tel Aviv Neurotech Cluster Thrives

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

israel_flag-300x240.jpgLast week David Brooks wrote a spot on column about innovation in Tel Aviv, Israel. This is readily apparent in my own analysis of the global neurotechnology industry where Tel Aviv is rapidly becoming an innovation hub for next generation drugs, devices and diagnostics for the brain and nervous systems as I recently described in NIO's Neurotech Clusters 2010 report:

Tel Aviv, Israel is the among the emerging nascent regions worldwide in neurotechnology. It ranks 11th overall (17 total companies; 9 neuropharmaceutical, 7 neurodevice, 14 private, 3 public). Of note, the region features a unique ratio of neurodevice to neuropharma companies; only Minneapolis has a higher percentage of device companies. Device companies in the region include BioLineRX, Brainsway, BrainsGate, NeuroSonix, SteadyMed Ltd., BioControl Medical, Ltd. and CogniFit. Tel Aviv also ranks 14th for capital with 7 risk capital sources, including notable biomedical investors Medica Venture Partners, BME Capital, and Agate Medical Investments.

While difficult to compare the neurotechnology infrastructure of Tel Aviv to most American cities, Israel boasts a strong university system; Nine universities are contained within a small geographic region and include Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Bar-Ilan University, Tel Aviv University, University of Haifa, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Open University of Israel.

Tel Aviv in particular is home to two research institutions with extensive neuroscience research activities; the Weizmann Institute of Science and Tel Aviv University. At the Weizmann Institute of Science, the neurotechnology activities are centered on the Department of Neurobiology and revolve around two major themes: the study of neuronal function at the molecular and cellular levels and the study of the CNS at the system level. Additional focus is placed on developing algorithms for the synaptic plasticity between neurons and studying injury models of nerve lesion including ischemia and stroke. Nearly 20 groups of researchers carry out both independent studies and collaborative research with colleagues from within the department and outside it.

At Tel Aviv University, the recently created Adams Super Center for Brain Studies provides an umbrella for research activity in the neurosciences by encouraging collaboration by faculty members from different disciplines. As an additional piece of the local infrastructure, The Israel Society for Neuroscience (ISFN) is a registered non-profit organization, founded in 1992 by several leading Israeli neuroscientists and now includes over 600 members.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurotech Industry

December 23, 2009

McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT - Must See 20 Minute Video

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

McGovern.png I highly recommend that you take 20 minutes over the next week to watch this important video that takes you on an intimate tour of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT.

As a member of the Leadership Board at the McGovern Institute, I've had the opportunity over the past several years to see first hand the brilliant, world-leading research occurring everyday at the Institute. I am extraordinarily inspired and impressed with the researchers' relentless focus on understanding the causes of neurological diseases and psychiatric illnesses. You will be too, once you watch the video.

Watch Video: Welcome to the McGovern Institute for Brain Research video

Research at the McGovern Institute is made possible by private and public funding. Gifts from individuals, families, and foundations allow them to pursue the research featured in this video. If you support brain research or are interested in making a difference in the development of cures for brain disorders then I recommend that you make an online donation to the McGovern Institute at the MIT Giving website or call their Development and Special Projects Officer, Laurie Ledeen, at 617-324-0134.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Brain Foundations

December 16, 2009

Neurofeedback Gets the Test

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

eeg%20neurofeedback2.jpgYesterday's Washington Post highlighted a wide scale eeg-based neurofeedback trial being conducted by the NIMH for ADHD. To date, neurofeedback for ADHD has been a cottage industry with continued attempts to bring it into the mainstream. However, lack of consensus around efficacy and its cost relative to popping pills have hindered patient adoption. Given the powerful nature of ADHD meds, it will be tough to compete on the same playing field, however, should the trials shed positive light on neurofeedback's ability to treat less aggressive forms of ADHD (which I believe is quite likely) neurofeedback should become a first in line treatment for many psychiatric illnesses over the next decade.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Mental Health Issues

December 10, 2009

New Neurotech Legislative Initiative in Early Development

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

DC.jpgBlogging has taken a back seat to a whole bunch of legislative projects, meetings (attending and organizing), and membership recruitment efforts. Here is a bit of insight into a new piece of legislation we may be pushing forward with at NIO in the coming year.

Transferable Priority Review Vouchers for Severe and Neglected Brain Diseases: A priority review voucher is an incentive for companies to invest in new drugs and medical devices for severe and neglected diseases of the brain and nervous system. The legislation would authorize the FDA to award a transferable “priority review voucher” to the sponsor (manufacturer) of a newly approved drug, biologic or medical device that targets severe and neglected brain diseases. The provision applies to New Drug Applications (NDAs), Biological License Applications (BLAs), 505(b)(2) applications, Premarket Approval applications (PMA) and Premaket Notification 510(k) applications. The voucher, which is transferable and can be sold, entitles the bearer to a priority review for another product.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NIO

November 9, 2009

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Forum on Neuroscience

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

Screen%20shot%202009-11-09%20at%203.51.40%20PM.pngOff to Princeton to participate in a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation meeting on Connecting Revolutions in Neuroscience with Health and Health Care tomorrow. We'll be engaged in a series of highly iterative, forward-looking discussions that will culminate in a wrap-up that integrates the thinking across neurotechnology, neuroscience and behavioral health and outlines connections and implications for the future of health and health care. Should be interesting!

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

October 30, 2009

Opportunities in Neuroscience for Future Army Applications

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

9780309127400.jpgFloyd Bloom and team have done all of us a service with this extensively researched and well thought out analysis. I'm using the findings right now on a new piece of legislation in development. Opportunities in Neuroscience for Future Army Applications makes 17 recommendations that focus on utilizing current scientific research and development initiatives to improve performance and efficiency, collaborating with pharmaceutical companies to employ neuropharmaceuticals for general sustainment or enhancement of soldier performance, and improving cognitive and behavioral performance using interdisciplinary approaches and technological investments. An essential guide for the Army, this book will also be of interest to other branches of military, national security and intelligence agencies, academic and commercial researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and others interested in applying the rapid advances in neuroscience to the performance of individual and group tasks.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurowarfare

October 22, 2009

Neurotech Clusters: Leading Regions in the Global Neurotechnology Industry

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

sf.jpgThis reports really represents the economic geographer in me wondering how the neurotech industry is developing across space. After months of data collection, writing and analysis here are the results. Go to the NIO website to download the 100 page report.

According to NeuroInsights and NIO, the top nine neurotech regions with composite scores are:
1. San Francisco Bay Area, CA (100)
2. Greater Boston, MA (98)
3. New York/New Jersey (91)
4. London, United Kingdom (84)
5. San Diego, CA (83)
6. Los Angeles/Irvine, CA (81)
7. Baltimore, MD (69)
8. Greater Philadelphia, PA (66)
9. Minneapolis, MN (53)

Other regions supporting neurotech innovation include nascent clusters (Montreal, Canada; Basel/Zurich, Switzerland; Tel Aviv, Israel; Seattle, WA; Stockholm, Sweden; Tokyo, Japan) as well as regions to watch (Munich, Germany; New Haven, CT; Chicago, IL; Shanghai, China, Cleveland, OH and Raleigh/Durham, NC).

The rankings are based on three broad factors: number of neuroscience-focused companies, availability of local risk capital and social infrastructure (universities, hospitals, research institutes). The San Francisco Bay Area ranked first in number of companies and risk capital, while Boston ranked first in social infrastructure.

Data gathered for the report also reveals several other interesting regional trends. New York/New Jersey is the leading region for public neurotechnology companies. Boston, MA and Baltimore/Washington D.C. are the leading regions for neurotechnology social infrastructure based on strong graduate programs and hospital rankings in neuroscience related areas. The San Francisco Bay Area, Minneapolis, MN and Cleveland, OH are major centers for neurodevice development.

A special thanks to Corey M. McCann, our bright and diligent intern for all his hard work on this project!

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurotech Industry

October 14, 2009

The Young and the Neuro "Revolution"

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

From prefix to adjective and now David Brooks makes "the Neuro" a noun. The meme lives.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

October 8, 2009

2010 Translational Neurotech Summit, Call For Speakers

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

2010NDFSummit%20banner%20448.jpgThe Neurotech Development Foundation is organizing a Translational Neurotech Summit on May 18, 2010. This one day gathering of scientists, entrepreneurs, executives and investors will be held coordination with The 5th annual Neurotech Investing and Partnering Conference May 19-20, 2010. The goal of the summit is to facilitate the movement of promising neurotechnology (pharmaceuticals, biologics, cell-based therapeutics, devices and diagnostics) from universities, government labs and research institutes into the private sector.

CALL FOR SPEAKERS
Showcase your translational research project to potential investors and partners:
* Cutting edge research projects ready for investment or hand off to industry (preclinical or clinical)
* Pharmaceuticals, biologics, cell therapies, devices, and diagnostics
* Presenter abstracts accepted from October 1 through January 5, 2010
* Presenters notified by February 15 and coached on presentation, partnering, and start-up strategy
* Presentations selected based on quality of research, interest to industry, and fit with program
* Presentations will be 10 minutes plus Q&A with session panel

The summit will feature the top researchers from across translational neuroscience including Alzheimer's, addiction, ALS, anxiety, depressive disorders, epilepsy, migraine, mild cognitive impairment, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis, obesity, pain, Parkinson's, schizophrenia, age-related macular degeneration, sensory disorders, sleep disorders, and stroke. Download Fillable Presenter Submission Form

Steering Committee:
-Casey Lynch, Managing Director, NeuroInsights & President, Neurotech Development Foundation
-Frank Eeckman, MD, PhD Consultant, NeuroInsights
-Jill Heemskerk, PhD, Program Director, Office of Translational Research, NINDS/NIH
-Charles Jennings, PhD, Director of McGovern Institute Neurotechnology Program, MIT
-Zack Lynch, Executive Director, Neurotechnology Industry Organization
-Dan O'Connell, Managing Director, NeuroVentures Capital
-Gail Schechter, PhD, Director Center for Bioentrepreneurship at UCSF
-Paul Stypulkowski, PhD, Senior Director Research, Medtronic
-Guy Seabrook, PhD, Senior Director, Neuroscience Global External Research &
Development, Eli Lilly

The summit is hosted by the Neurotechnology Development Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit created to accelerate the development of treatments for the brain and nervous system by promoting translation of basic research.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NIO

September 24, 2009

Half the Sky - The Greatest Moral Issue of Our Time

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

Screen%20shot%202009-09-24%20at%202.38.57%20PM.pngNicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn have joined forces to publish "Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women" which was released earlier this month. I just ordered my copy. Here is their reasoning why.

IN THE 19TH CENTURY, the paramount moral challenge was slavery. In the 20th century, it was totalitarianism. In this century, it is the brutality inflicted on so many women and girls around the globe: sex trafficking, acid attacks, bride burnings and mass rape.

Yet if the injustices that women in poor countries suffer are of paramount importance, in an economic and geopolitical sense the opportunity they represent is even greater. “Women hold up half the sky,” in the words of a Chinese saying, yet that’s mostly an aspiration: in a large slice of the world, girls are uneducated and women marginalized, and it’s not an accident that those same countries are disproportionately mired in poverty and riven by fundamentalism and chaos. There’s a growing recognition among everyone from the World Bank to the U.S. military’s Joint Chiefs of Staff to aid organizations like CARE that focusing on women and girls is the most effective way to fight global poverty and extremism. That’s why foreign aid is increasingly directed to women. The world is awakening to a powerful truth: Women and girls aren’t the problem; they’re the solution."



I couldn't agree more.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurosociety

September 21, 2009

2019 - President Signs NINA (Neuro Information Nondiscrimination Act)

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

NINA.pngA few weeks ago I participated in a day long discussion at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto around the topic of When Everything is Programmable. Lots of very interesting scenarios and viewpoints were shared. For my part, I stuck to the theme of our emerging neurosociety. Towards the end of the day each of us were asked to write up a 10 year scenario focused on our area of expertise. Jake Dunagan, IFTF's Director of Technology Horizons Program and fellow neurofuturist joined me in sketching out this scenario which touches on a whole set of emerging issues. This is not meant to be comprehensive, more so a quick sketch we put together in 45 minutes.

September 13, 2019 President Signs NINA (Neuro Information Nondiscrimination Act)

Inspired by the GINA (Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act) legislation passed in 2008, NINA might include areas such as:

-Explicit right to cognitive liberty, brain privacy
-Bans discrimination in hiring based on neuroimaging profile
-Bans all local, state 'drug vaccine' programs
-Bans 'neuroprofiling' for travel and attendance at public events
-Subsidizes accelerated learning with neuroenablement technologies
-Legalizes use of neuroenablers
-Bans denial of health coverage based on neuroprofile
-Bans cosmetic memory erasure

The scenario is being accelerated by the development of more sophisticated imaging technologies, neuroinformatic analysis algorithms, neurofeedback technologies, research into neuroplasticity, drug vaccine, neuropharma and neurodevice R&D.

The reason this scenario was seen as important to sketch out was that right now we have a whole host of technologies that are emerging without an effective policy infrastructure. There will be severe unintended consequences as technologies accelerate across a wide variety of enabling disciplines and national governments may eventually need to step in to protect their populations and their basic human rights.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NeuroWave 2050

September 10, 2009

Decade of Mind V Takes the Message to Berlin

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

handbrain.pngBig brain thinkers are aggregating in Berlin over next few days for the Decade of the Mind V Conference. The three themes are Education (how neuroscience can aid educational research and policy); Social Policy (how neuroeconomics can inform public policy); and Health (neurotech developments for brain related illness).

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: NeuroWave 2050

September 4, 2009

Perception Shifting Leads to Dizzy Future

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

Energy-.jpgIn Chapter Nine, Perception Shift, we explore the societal implications of a time when people across all walks of life intentionally choose to use neurotechnologies to influence their mood, senses and memories. By subtly influencing one's mental self - improving cognitive clarity, extending physical sensations, expanding emotional well being - we will ultimately begin to change how we perceive daily events. In short, society will experience a perception shift. There are profound ethical, legal and societal issues with moving down this pathway, but it does indeed seem like this is a likely path that many may take as we travel deeper into the emerging neurosociety.

A recent article in the Prospect written by David Edmonds, The Age of Enhancement, highlights the complexities that arise when considering the societal impact of conscious mental enhancement, "At the heart of the debate there remains unease about tampering with the very things that make humans human. And while we are becoming accustomed to some varieties of enhancement, our capacity to manipulate not just our bodies and our cognitive faculties, but potentially also our core emotions, is taking us into a world of dizzyingly new options."

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

August 25, 2009

Where Are the Neurofinancial Software Applications?

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

BrainStockPage.pngIn chapter 4, Finance with Feelings, I talk about the emergence of neurosoftware applications that leverage neuroeconomic research into decision making to improve our understanding of individual economic behavior and the vicissitudes of financial markets. As with each previous revolution, the financial sector adopts the latest innovations to improve capital efficiency. The Neuro Revolution is no different. In response to requests to emails from people looking for more info on software that could help them "understand how their emotions influence their decisions" or "tame their emotions" I'm writing this brief neurofinance post.

Realize that these applications are just beginning to be developed. The more sophisticated work is still being carried out in the research labs of people like Andrew Lo, Dmitry Repin, Xiao-Jing Wang, Paul Zak and others. If you are serious, then I'd highly recommend attending the upcoming Society for Neuroeconomics meeting Sept. 27-29 in Evanston, Illinois to get insights into cutting edge research. Richard Peterson, whose story I describe in detail in the book founded a $50M hedge fund, MarketPsy Capital, that uses special emotion detecting algorithms to help time trades.

Evidence of the evolution of these neurofinancial software applications is everywhere. Sunday's NYTimes carried a story, Mining the Web for Feelings no Facts, that discussed several companies developing "sentiment analysis" systems. Perhaps more interesting was Monday's WSJ article "The Mistakes We Make - and Why We Make Them" which is loaded with basic ideas for neurofinancial applications. In the article, Mr. Statman, a professor at Santa Clara University points out eights ways to avoid the cognitive and emotion errors that lead to poor investing. One clear theme throughout his musings is that "regret" plays a pivotal role many of our worst mistakes. Also, here is a post I wrote in 2003 with some oldies but still undeveloped goodies.

So the bottom line is this: the future isn't here yet, go invent it.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurofinance

August 19, 2009

h+ Magazine Gladly Greets The Neuro Revolution

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

hplus.pngh+ Magazine reviewed The Neuro Revolution and published an interview with me. My favorite line from the review, "This is a thought-provoking and important read that deserves a wide audience." And from the interview, "Through neurotechnology we can possibly accelerate peoples' senses of themselves and their relationship to their higher being."

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

Cerebrum on Huerta's Book Review

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

In his review of The Neuro Revolution by Zack Lynch, Michael F. Huerta compliments the animated style Lynch uses to describe how our understanding of the brain and newfound ability to affect it via drugs and technology are changing our lives and our societies. Lynch’s predictions for the future are both exciting and within the realm of scientific possibility.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

August 18, 2009

Wonderful Review of "The Neuro Revolution" in Cerebrum

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

cerebrum.pngMichael Huerta just wrote a wonderful review of The Neuro Revolution for Cerebrum published by the Dana Foundation. I've excerpted a few of his insights here, but I recommend reading the whole review, Our Neurotech Future.

Michael F. Huerta, Ph.D., is the associate director for scientific technology research at the NIMH and leads neuroscience and neurotechnology programs and initiatives at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He directs the NIH’s Human Connectome Project, the National Database for Autism Research and the Office of Cross-Cutting Science and co-chairs the coordinating committee of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research.

"Technology’s potential to improve—or to imperil—our lives and our societies lies at the center of this entertaining and thought-provoking book by Zack Lynch, founder and executive director of the Neurotechnology Industry Organization.

Written for a lay audience, The Neuro Revolution begins with Lynch’s description of his first bungee jump, from the canopy of a lush rain forest, followed by a shock of pain from an injured spine when his second jump went awry. The experience inspired him to explore neuroscience and neurotechnology (Lynch defines the latter as “the tools we use to understand and influence our brain and nervous system”). With prose that is at times clever and quirky but never dull, Lynch discusses how our understanding of the human brain—as well as our ability to influence it—may shape the future of law, commerce, art, warfare and religion.

Along the way, we read stories of discovery and invention set in a variety of contexts and disciplines. Lynch’s anecdotes illustrate how the findings and technologies of brain science might alter society. He supports his stories and personal musings with references to reader-friendly articles and books; comments and insights from scientists, artists, ethicists and other experts; and historical facts that help the reader appreciate the full trajectory of a discovery.

... Lynch describes this and other neurotechnologies with characteristic zeal and animation without wandering too far from rigorous scientific interpretation. This is a difficult balance to achieve.
...Given the broad perspective Lynch takes in this book, readers may argue that he should have addressed additional technologies, neuroscience findings and ethical or legal implications more thoroughly. However, suggesting that additional points could be made or that topics could be explored further is more an acknowledgement of the richness and import of Lynch’s subject matter than a criticism of what this slim book offers.
...The Neuro Revolution is a timely and approachable introduction to the power of neuroscience and neurotechnology to shape our world, inside and out.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

August 11, 2009

Center for Neuroscience and Society at UPenn Launched

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

PennCNS.pngThe University of Pennsylvania has a very rich tradition in the brain sciences. In 1953, Penn founded the nation’s first university-wide institute devoted exclusively to neuroscience research, the Mahoney Institute of Neurological Sciences. Since then, Penn has developed multiple communities to support some of the world’s leading neuroscience research, including the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, the Center for Functional Neuroimaging and the Penn Comprehensive Neuroscience Center. Last year Penn announced plans to build a new Neural and Behavioral Sciences Building and has launched a $50 million initiative to recruit Penn Integrates Knowledge professors who take an interdisciplinary approach to neuroscience.

Yesterday, UPenn took another broad step into the future by announcing the founding of the Penn Center for Neuroscience and Society. The Center is cross-disciplinary endeavor to increase understanding of the impact of neuroscience on society through research and teaching and to encourage the responsible use of neuroscience for the benefit of humanity. The reach of the CNS will extend beyond academia and engage policy makers, advocacy groups, industry and professionals in the full range of fields affected by progress in neuroscience such as business, the military, law and education.

In an email yesterday, Martha Farah, Director of the CNS, described the aims of the center as being "very much aligned with the aims of your organization [NIO], and the social and historical perspective you present in your excellent new book are also very consistent with ours. So, I welcome your participation as we embark on the mission of the Center: to increase understanding of the impact of neuroscience on society."

Not only does the Center's development underscore the continuing evolution of The Neuro Revolution but it also supports our case up on Capitol Hill as we lobby Congress to pass the National Neurotechnology Initiative Act which contains over $10M/year in neuroethics related research funding.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuroethics

August 7, 2009

"Neuro Revolution" From Prefix to Adjective

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

300_82094.gifIn his commentary Brave Neuro World Paul McFedries at IEEE Spectrum highlights how "the term neuro made the leap from prefix to adjective recently with the publication last month of The Neuro Revolution."

As you can imagine, we thought long and hard about the title for the book. Years back I considered Brain Wave (a play on the physical phenomenon, the patterns of historical techno-economic waves, and the close association with the name of this blog). Obviously, The Neuro Revolution won for multitude of reasons, one of them being the desire to raise "neuro" to a new status.

The prefix to adjective shift is of monumental significance. Neuro refers to more than just the ways that neuroscience and neurotechnologies will drive social, economic and political developments but also to the many new ways of viewing, understanding and existing that will emerge as we assimilate neuro-derived and inspired tools and practices into our lives throughout the 21st century. This is similar to how the adjectives Industrial and Information placed before Revolution connoted much greater meaning than a type of technology or science.

At all of my discussions over the two last week in DC, NYC, Boston, Palo Alto, San Francisco, I continually shared that the primary reason for writing the book was to spark an ongoing broad public dialogue about how brain science, neurotechnology and new ways of viewing situations will transform nearly every aspect of human life - from law enforcement to the financial markets, to marketing, art, entertainment, religion, warfare and even what it means to be human.

I was heartened a few days after my talk at MIT, attended by over 100 neuroscientists, that it generated enough interest in the societal implications of their research that they are already working on a follow on series focused on emerging issues.

While there is already a burgeoning neuroethics community, it is time to expand the community. Given the extraordinary changes coming, it must begin to include people from all walks of life, yet another reason to write a book less laden in terminology and more focused on story and human interest. Let the conversations grow!

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

July 24, 2009

The Neuro Revolution published!

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

TNR-Cover-Final-Web-250a.jpgMy book, The Neuro Revolution: How Brain Science Is Changing Our World is now in book stores and Amazon. Book overview:

History has already progressed through an agricultural revolution, an industrial revolution, and an information revolution. The Neuro Revolution foretells a fast approaching fourth epoch, one that will radically transform how we all work, live and play.

Neurotechnology - brain imaging and other new tools for both understanding and influencing our brains - is accelerating the pace of change almost everywhere, from financial markets to law enforcement to politics to advertising and marketing, artistic expression, warfare, and even religious belief.

The Neuro Revolution introduces you to the brilliant people leading this worldwide transformation, taking you into their laboratories, boardrooms and courtrooms for a unique, insider's glimpse into the startling future now appearing at our doorstep. From foolproof lie detectors to sure-fire investment strategies to super-enhanced religious and aesthetic experiences, the insights and revelations within The Neuro Revolution will foster wonder, debate, and in some cases consternation. Above all, though, they need to be understood by those who will be most affected - all of us.

We had a great book launched party last night at Foreign Cinema in San Francisco and it's now at book stores, Amazon, etc.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category:

Human Connectome Project Launched to Reveal Brain Connectivity

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

picture1_hagmann.jpgThe National Institutes of Health Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, a program targeted for additional federal support in the National Neurotechnology Initiative, is launching a $30 million project that will use cutting-edge brain imaging technologies to map the circuitry of the healthy adult human brain. By systematically collecting brain imaging data from hundreds of subjects, the Human Connectome Project (HCP) will yield insight into how brain connections underlie brain function. This project will be viewed in time as sparking the development of many important innovations that will help accelerate the the Neuro Revolution.

Three imaging techniques that will be used to carry out the HCP may include: (1)High angular resolution diffusion imaging with magnetic resonance (HARDI), which detects the diffusion of water along fibrous tissue, and can be used to visualize axon bundles. (2) Resting state fMRI (R-fMRI), which detects fluctuations in brain activity while a person is at rest, and can be used to look for coordinated networks within the brain. (3) Electrophysiology and magnetoencephalography (MEG) combined with fMRI (E/M fMRI), which adds information about the brain's electrical activity to the fMRI signal. In this procedure, the person performs a task so that the brain regions associated with that task become active. Since this is the first time that researchers will combine these brain imaging technologies to systematically map the brain's connections, the HCP will support development of new data models, informatics and analytic tools to help researchers make the most of the data.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurodiagnostics

July 23, 2009

The Witness on Your Shoulders

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

article00.jpgIn chapter two, The Witness on Your Shoulders of The Neuro Revolution, I focus on the emerging field of neurolaw. It's an extraordinarily interesting and provocative area of research that will continue the evolve rapidly in the coming years as new techniques and technologies emerge to help us peer more effectively into the brain as it contemplates ideas, such as lying or telling the truth. Which brings me to the purpose of this blog post.

There has recently been some exciting press around the Josh Greene's work around using fMRI for the purposes of lie detection and the continue skepticism surrounding its use here. As Time's Adi Narayan succinctly put it, "On an fMRI image, at least, the lying brain may look no different from one that's simply contemplating whether to lie."

So with today's technology I would agree, yet, as I argue throughout the book and have discussed here many times, major technological revolutions begin with a 15 year period of technological transformation. During these periods of rapid innovation new tools emerge that radically surpass what was previously believed to be possible. We are only just entering this period. So just because current imaging techniques appear to weak at being able detect deception, don't let this fool us. We must continue to think through the ethical, legal and societal implications of truth detection technologies, because they will emerge, and will transform our system of jurisprudence in many, many ways.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

July 16, 2009

The Neuro Revolution book launch and tour

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

TNR-Cover-Final-Web-250.jpgThe book is finally coming out this weekend! Here are a few places where I'll be speaking over the next couple of weeks. Come out and join the dialogue. More tour information here.

July 21, 7pm Book Passage, Corte Madera, CA
July 23, 6-8pm, SF Book Launch Party, Foreign Cinema, SF, CA
July 27, 7pm, Borders, 1801 K Street, Washington D.C.
July 28, 3-5pm, Capitol Hill, Capitol Visitors Center, Senate Rooms, D.C.
July 29, 6-8 pm, NYC Book Launch Party, Scuderia, NY, NY
July 30, 12:00pm, MIT, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Boston, MA
July 30, 7pm, Barnes & Noble, Burlington, MA
Aug. 3, 7pm, Books Inc., Palo Alto, CA

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neuro Revolution

July 6, 2009

Neurolaw in London Today

Email This Entry

Posted by Zack Lynch

If you are London today check out UCL's Law and Neuroscience Colloquium happening July 6-7.

Comments (0) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Neurolaw